Only the passionate & relentless need apply

We’ve got a $75 to $100 a week, 5-7 hours social media gig, telling the story of regenerative reforestation, indigenous wealth creation at market rate over the long term. with can evolve into a role in an event in May called Regenerative about regenerative economy and culture, with the Buckminster Fuller Institute with Amanda Joy Ravenhill leading it, relaunching Space ship earth. It’s the BFI challenge meets Clinton Global Initiative; come like Terragenesis and launch your blockchain for carbon, but the cohort wins, not one winner, and we create the network to help them succeed with funding, support of various kinds, linked to the SDG’s as key markers. UNDP doing creative stuff in Armenia, Georgia and Moldova on this one, too.

This is a ground floor gig on the next big thing. Impact investing will be a part of the Regenerative platform, but its not about impact investing. Hours flexible. Only the passionate need apply.
Video

Investing with Indigenous People

Translating indigenous values into finance and enterprise

Venture philanthropy and impact investing are rapidly growing fields blurring traditional lines between philanthropy and for profit investing. Instead of turning a blind eye to applying values to investing, people are increasingly working from a perspective of interconnectedness where the same values that would be applied to grantmaking are applied to investing. While this is a new paradigm for finance, many indigenous societies have never separated commerce from honoring the earth and valuing the well-being of community. This lively panel was convened in October 2014 at the World Summit on Indigenous Philanthropy to share perspectives of indigenous values-driven business, grant makers and impact investors working to foster practical solutions to complex social and environmental challenges including job creation, cultural revitalization and environmental stewardship.

Moderator: Shaun Paul, Reinventure Capital
Panelists
Amy Fredeen, Cook Inlet Tribal Council
Sonja Swift, Swift Foundation
Donna Morton, Principum
Kevin Jones, Social Capital Markets (SoCap)

 

 

It’s time 2 build the kids-led biodiversity bonds par

This is where I will start to put together, thoughts, partners, and the evolving framework of the kids-led riparian justice biodiversity bond. We are basing it on the real world example of biodiversity as the path to justice for indigenous people in Borneo that is told in the movie Rise of the Ecowarriors, with longtime partner in crime Mark White and Cynthia LaGrou of Compathos a film making and distributing foundation. We have parts of the team. We want to build use place-sourcing and pattern recognition to build regenerative communities within a network where peer learning and emergent adaptation thrives.

This bond is part of the  Neighborhood Economics project, which has been given skunk works R&D funding for the past nine months by Good Capital, where I, Kevin Jones, lead portfolio company engagement. We will be talking about the progress toward the bond at SOCAP15, the largest social enterprise meets impact investor, meets development agency, meets foundations conference in the world, the place where people discover unlikely allies as they meet surprising but valuable strangers.

Riding a food fad to an opportunity

A recent article on investigating if rising consumer demand for chia seeds can help farmers in developing countries.  It would be an ironic return for an ancient crop. Chia originated in Mexico and Guatemala some 3,500 years ago, when the seeds were a staple food of the Mayans and Aztecs. The Spanish conquistadors, in attempting to squash the local culture, banned the indigenous peoples from eating it.

Last part of the 1st round of interviews: Deals and Companies

Good Capital, the previous fund, has invested among others in fair trade companies. What can be learnt from the experience so far? Kevin tells us: 

Next, Kevin presents another example of the kind of deals that the fund wants to make in the future.

So, how do these people actually find those potential companies to invest in and based on what criteria? Shaun gives us an answer:

Interview series takes a look at resilience

This post is a follow up to the first highlights from the interviews introduced last week. Before deals and companies next week, let’s take a look at resilience, especially of socio-ecological systems.

Resilience is one of the key constructs that the fund draws on. The Stockholm Resilience Center, one of our partners, offers deep experience measuring holistic impact and their 9 planetary boundaries for resilience inform our selection of investment opportunities and risk analysis.

Kevin tells us how he sees resilience: 

Shaun’s view on resilience and it’s usefulness as a framework: 

Thank you for reading and watching, and don’t forget to like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.  If you have any comments or questions, please leave them below or contact bioculturalresilience@gmail.com.

Happy New Year 2014!

How do you fund cutting edge commons technology?

The Caltrope project is really mesmerizing (no surprise, since it’s the brainchild of a Hungarian conceptual installation artist). Let’s jump ahead and assume we could figure out how to produce it cheaply and in volume. To pay for it we move into the world of long term project finance, which I know nothing about. What’s the net present value of the future cash flows enabled by filling in the soil at the edge of a fragile and eroding delta like that of the Mississippi? What are the upstream benefits?

And then how do you sell bleeding edge promising technology, assuming you found enlightened economic development and conservation players who would see its value and the need for its deployment with an agile need for speed and with an entrepreneurial fail-forward attitude, since you are doing alpha tests of technology trying to get to a product that works in a reasonable amount of time? They would need to know they need to fund product development.

It would take someone with a lot of patience to do that, to keep explaining the concept, as you move up the desks from your initial entry into an agency. I’ve done that several times, but it can take, in my case, up to 18 months to get what I wanted even when the value for participating was totally clear.

I don’t have the patience for that today. And I was not as good as it as someone with a more patient temperament would be, someone who can be happy with slogging upward and getting incremental steps forward. That’s a great thing to do. I’ve done it, but am too old and impatient for larger long term change to tie myself down to that kind of process now. But if someone stepped up to do it, to productize Caltrope, I would help.