Last part of the 1st round of interviews: Deals and Companies

Good Capital, the previous fund, has invested among others in fair trade companies. What can be learnt from the experience so far? Kevin tells us: 

Next, Kevin presents another example of the kind of deals that the fund wants to make in the future.

So, how do these people actually find those potential companies to invest in and based on what criteria? Shaun gives us an answer:

Interview series takes a look at resilience

This post is a follow up to the first highlights from the interviews introduced last week. Before deals and companies next week, let’s take a look at resilience, especially of socio-ecological systems.

Resilience is one of the key constructs that the fund draws on. The Stockholm Resilience Center, one of our partners, offers deep experience measuring holistic impact and their 9 planetary boundaries for resilience inform our selection of investment opportunities and risk analysis.

Kevin tells us how he sees resilience: 

Shaun’s view on resilience and it’s usefulness as a framework: 

Thank you for reading and watching, and don’t forget to like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.  If you have any comments or questions, please leave them below or contact bioculturalresilience@gmail.com.

Happy New Year 2014!

How do you fund cutting edge commons technology?

The Caltrope project is really mesmerizing (no surprise, since it’s the brainchild of a Hungarian conceptual installation artist). Let’s jump ahead and assume we could figure out how to produce it cheaply and in volume. To pay for it we move into the world of long term project finance, which I know nothing about. What’s the net present value of the future cash flows enabled by filling in the soil at the edge of a fragile and eroding delta like that of the Mississippi? What are the upstream benefits?

And then how do you sell bleeding edge promising technology, assuming you found enlightened economic development and conservation players who would see its value and the need for its deployment with an agile need for speed and with an entrepreneurial fail-forward attitude, since you are doing alpha tests of technology trying to get to a product that works in a reasonable amount of time? They would need to know they need to fund product development.

It would take someone with a lot of patience to do that, to keep explaining the concept, as you move up the desks from your initial entry into an agency. I’ve done that several times, but it can take, in my case, up to 18 months to get what I wanted even when the value for participating was totally clear.

I don’t have the patience for that today. And I was not as good as it as someone with a more patient temperament would be, someone who can be happy with slogging upward and getting incremental steps forward. That’s a great thing to do. I’ve done it, but am too old and impatient for larger long term change to tie myself down to that kind of process now. But if someone stepped up to do it, to productize Caltrope, I would help.

Video

Infographic shows why Branson’s Virgin formula for branding #biodiversity is so right on

This video by a Vancouver art student group is a good overview of the value of #biodiversity, but seeing it makes me realize how much I like Richard Branson’s method of branding biodiversity.

Richard Branson’s Biodiversity Branding Formula has five elements. Start with A. an at risk animal that’s cute or magnificent (for biodiversity, cute and exotic may trump charismatic megafauna (lions, hippos, etc.) The big animals are usually seen alone; the small animals are believably dependent on context; local habitat, and ecosystem. Then it says B. We are starting to make a difference; we are protecting its habitat, it’s coming back in some places. Next he says C. That it’s safe to give to this country or region; there are fair elections on the way, or some other validator so that people won’t be afraid to give or get involved there. The rule of law is essential for biocultural diversity. That’s why the confluence this September of the UN and International Funders for Indigenous People annual conference and the first ever real time meeting of representatives of indigenous nations and the nation states of the UN is so important and why I plan to be  deeply involved in those September gatherings.

Then there is D. a brief mention of the fact that biodiversity is good for people, too. But you don’t sell that too hard; you don’t lead with it. I’ve learned in seven years of involvement with Fair Trade companies, that the message of linking poverty alleviation is not one you lead with if you want to talk to a broad audience. It doesn’t resonate well with people beyond a core group of justice seekers.

There could be a greater link with faith based people in the U.S. on this, as there is in the UK. The tragic failure of Fair Trade USA to make this a key component of their message has to be overcome. In the UK, 83 % of grocery store buying decisions are positively impacted by fair trade as a factor. In the U.S.  it’s under 10 % largely, I think, in the UK the governing fair trade organization linked faith based people with activists, while in the U.S. the leadership was only about motivating activists. Until the church and the secular justice activists effectively link up, selling justice as a key reason to get important things done will lag behind using environmental motivations.

Finally, when you look the pictures on Branson’s project on Pinterest, E. the money line appears; not in the story. There is no intrusion into the story experience of Branson’s business reasons for being involved in biodiversity (whatever his personal reasons are). That’s the way to sell. Let the cute animals lead the way. Follow with the reassurance that it’s safe to give and that there is reason to hope, mention the people in passing, and leave the money pitch until the story is finished and has gotten its proper reaction.

Image

Richard Branson shows how to sell biodiversity

In this post on the Virgin site savvy marketer Richard Branson outlines what is probably an effective way to reach the masses with the concept of biodiversitylemursmadagascarYou hold a cute animal, talk about the sadness of its loss, then say it’s safe to give and care about the country (in this case, Madagascar) because the next elections will be free and fair, and wind up by saying biodiversity is ALSO good for people. No irony there; there are many more lemur lovers with many more dollars than there are people who take action to care about poor people. There is also a documentary video

Pitches about biodiversity probably need that charismatic fauna appeal to get people to pay attention. Crises and now, with biodiversity as the goal, opportunities focusing on primates and megafauna (rhinos, elephants, lions, etc.) have proven to be effective to get people to take action. Virgin’s autopopulated pinterest  tagline says “biodiversity is vital to development.” Which also brings in business utility.

The post also mentions the upside of ecotourism, which Branson’s airline is obviously in favor of. The pattern of the pitch, from cute animal, to trusted place to give to (part of the Victorian need to only give to the “deserving poor)”, followed by the payoff for the people and closing with the upside for the local people and ecosystem of ecotourism is one that I think could work as a template for other places.

And the hidden message, encapsulated in every pinterest picture from the site, that biodiversity is good for development, is probably situated in the right place within the story’s frame.

Rockefeller puts energy behind resilience blog

The Rockefeller Foundation, which is funding chief resilience officers in 33 cities, 11 in the U.S., six of which have Impact Hubs, is making its blog a good source of news and commentary about resilience.

Branding the Regenerative Capital Fund

I like the idea of describing the thesis of the Regenerative Capital Fund as a bridge between the ideas of John Fullerton at the Capital Institute and his co author Hunter Lovins and the ideas of Morgan Simon and Andrea Armeni and her team at Transform Finance. If it works, we will be a fungible anecdote for two related, aligned but not yet actively partnering, as in making common cause, for two groups of thought leaders.  We can, if we do this well, be an example each one uses to illustrate how a fund would make use of their ideas,  as they explain to people how the world should be. We want to be one of the funds they point to as an iconic example.

My simple formulation of our thesis is we are about biodiversity meets inclusion at the corner of non extractive profits. Good Capital Holdings in investing in the General Partnership of the fund, (one of three we are investing in)in order to inform the thesis; the truth they are trying to prove and show the world. Shaun Paul is the managing director, with Ed Dugger the transaction guy and the one who has sold institutional players.

It’s really that simple. They carry our story everywhere they go. People who want to get serious about those ideas find us. We have a sidecar donor advised fund, (DAF) so the average person who can put up $5,000 can invest directly in our companies, or in us. We give them the choice; we have to validate our position as an intermediary in a transparent marketplace. We could even be paid with tips, like Kiva when they saw something good they realized we had a significant hand in.

I am thinking of ways to make our fund communal, partly owned by the community, easily, maybe through local lending clubs, which also let people put in small dollars. There is one forming here that I will be participating here. I plan to invest in Accelerating Appalachia this fund’s sister accelerator through that. I could not find a way to invest in a single seed stage company was in line with our Good Capital Holdings thesis. We are investing in horizontal ecosystem infrastructure. My continual push as I work with RegenCap is to push for the best story. Shaun and my own good sense will moderate that desire to make the story I want conform to reality. It will be fun.

Iirro Niemi and Anna Blume got us this far. I am excited to continue to work with them.

We also plan to tell this story as kind of road to SOCAP14 building the Regenerative Capital Fund reality series with this blog cross-posted on the SOCAP site. We will also open that platform to other funds which are forming.

Overall, my goal this year to light up and connect the nodes in my network, from the Impact Hubs we now own and operate in TriBeCa, Philly, San Francisco and soon DC with SOCAP and the funds and companies Good Capital Holdings (GCH) is investing in.